Immigration Applications going online. Beware

Seems like the Canadian government is catching up with the times. Many immigration applications are now going online which means applicants are instructed to complete them on the web rather than print them out, fill them in and snail-mail them to immigration centres.

This online application approach of course has its obvious benefits: paperless process, easy access, no mistakes sending applications to the wrong address. However, be aware of the pit falls. Once you push “send” , you are locked in. If you make a mistake, it is not so easy to correct. Further, the temptation of filling out an immigration form online gives the false impression that immigration applications are easy things like a “click of the mouse”. If only this were the case.

I have no doubt that refusal rates will not decline but rather increase due to online access. The easy access afforded to people online will encourage more mistakes in form completion and  accuracy, as well as presenting information to support their cases etc.

I therefore fear that without proper warnings: And I don’t count on the government to provide them–people will be lead into a false sense of security with immigration applications only to be surprised to find refusal letters in their in-boxes.

There is no free lunch. And this applies to immigration application forms, on or off line.



Michael Niren

About Michael Niren

Michael is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He is a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Canadian Bar Association’s Citizenship and Immigration Section and the Associate Member of the American Bar Association. Read more

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