New Brunswick Family Faces Deportation From Canada After Eight Years

Family faces deportation from Canada for medical issue after eight years

The family of an autistic child who has lived in Canada for eight years is now facing deportation from Canada. The family is originally from Korea, and could not get their temporary resident permits extended.

One of the family’s sons, aged 15, was diagnosed with autism and epilepsy at age five, but Citizen and Immigration has told them his treatment would be too expensive. For a number of years the family has operated a shop in Moncton, New Brunswick. Their eldest son is currently studying in Halifax to become a dentist.

An economic development consultant told CBC news that such action sends the wrong message to folks who immigrate to Canada. And that message is, if you take more than you put in, you’re gone.

“It’s one thing to make that kind of calculation to people maybe looking at moving to Canada; it’s totally another thing to say to people that are already here and committed to building their lives here, ‘Now we’re going to do an economic calculation that says you’re taking out more than you’re putting in, so you’re gone,'” he said.

“I worry that this sends a really bad signal to both the current immigrants that are making a life in Canada and the ones that might be considering moving here,” he added.

According to CBC, the family is planning to leave. Temporary residents in Canada and their families may have to pass a medical exam, but they may not have to depending on their circumstances. Permanent residents and their family members must pass a medical exam.

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Michael Niren

About Michael Niren

Michael is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He is a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Canadian Bar Association’s Citizenship and Immigration Section and the Associate Member of the American Bar Association. Read more

6 thoughts on “New Brunswick Family Faces Deportation From Canada After Eight Years

  1. eliane chekrallah

    Dear all

    My name is eliane from lebanon i have medical condition. the life in lebanon is too hard become harder & harder day after day I need peaceful life the medicaments are too expensive I need your help plz I need your support thank you.

    1. owen

      Hello Eliane,

      Thanks for the question. I am sorry to hear about the difficulties you’ve experienced. There may be a variety of immigration options available to you, and this may include asylum. We can definitely help you explore your options, so please don’t hesitate to fill out our free online assessment form, one of our immigration professionals will be in touch with you shortly


  2. Jeegar

    Dear Alicia,

    My question was in regard to my daughter’s diagnosis of cerebral palsy (CP).

    Following our landing in Canada in Nov 2008 (as a PR), my daughter was diagnosed with a medical condition called cerebral palsy in 2010.

    In Nov 2011, I would be completing my 3-year stay in canada (Nov 2008 – Nov 2011) and would be eligible to appy for citizenship.

    I wanted to know if there would be any implication of my daughter’s medical condition while I file for citizenship (please advise in context of the above article).

    Thank you.

    1. Alicia Kim

      Dear Jeegar,

      The above article is about Temporary Resident Permit (TRP). For a TRP, a person is restricted in her authorized length of stay and she is subject to various other conditions. When a person renews her TRP, her eligibility may be affected if she or her family members have possible inadmissible issues (i.e. medical or criminal) and if she can only resolve her inadmissibility or non-compliance by leaving Canada. Also, when she renews her TRP, she has to go through a medical exam.

      For citizenship, you should not have any problem as long as you meet the following conditions:

      •have lived in Canada for at least three of the four years preceding the date of application,
      •be able to communicate in English or French (adults 55 years of age or older are exempted), and
      •have adequate knowledge of Canada and of the responsibilities and privileges of citizenship (adults 55 years of age or older are exempted).

      Thank you.

  3. Jeegar


    I became a PR in November 2008. My 6-year-old daughter was diagnosed with CP in 2010.

    I will be filing citizenship application in November 2011. What are my options? Please advise.


    1. Alicia Kim

      Dear Jeegar,

      I am not sure if I understand your question correctly. If you are asking about your eligibility to apply for citizenship, you need to have lived in Canada for three years in the past four years.

      If this doesn’t answer your question, please give me more details about your situation so that I can better assist you.

      Thank you.


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