5 Myths About Canadian Permanent Residency

canadian perminent residency

Avoid These Five Myths of Permanent Residency

Dealing with the bureaucracy of Canada’s immigration system can be a daunting task. The laws, rules and regulations create a complicated process that results in misinformation being passed around as truth. The following five myths are common falsehoods, all of which can confuse your journey as permanent resident, or worse, cause you to accidentally become expelled from the country.

Myth: Permanent Residency Is Permanent

When you successfully apply for permanent residency within Canada, there’s a temptation to believe that permanent residency is permanent, regardless of how you decide to proceed once you’ve received your card. However, if the government of Canada believes that you haven’t been meeting your obligations to maintain your permanent residency, you may find yourself in a situation where your status as a PR becomes challenged.

The information provided by the Government of Canada’s Immigration and Citizenship website outlines the loss of permanent residency if “an adjudicator determines that you are no longer a permanent resident following an inquiry” or if “a visa officer determines you do not meet the required residency when you apply for a permanent resident travel document or temporary resident travel document.”

Another method through which permanent residency is lost is through Canadian citizenship. Alternatively, you may also apply to voluntarily renounce permanent residency, which is a good idea if you wish to travel to Canada but foresee that you will not be able to meet the obligations to maintain your status as a permanent resident.

Myth: Permanent Residents May Spend As Much Time Out of the Country As They Wish

Often, permanent residents of Canada spend plenty of time outside the borders of Canada, whether travelling for family, business or pleasure. While the Canadian government doesn’t restrict entry and exit of permanent residents, some permanent residents may be surprised to find that they must spend a certain amount of time within Canadian borders to maintain their obligations.

If you spend two out of five years living outside of Canada, you may find yourself in danger of losing PR rights and status. Making matters more complex is the fact that the five-year window may shift, so that any stretch of five years in which you’ve been away for more than two may be counted against your obligations.

Myth: A Small Lie On Your Application Won’t Come Back to Haunt You

The information that you provide as you apply for your permanent residency becomes a part of permanent records, which may be accessed and fact-checked at any time. As a result, if you provide misinformation, whether accidentally or purposefully, you risk losing the privilege to work and live within the borders of Canada.

There are a variety of reasons why the government of Canada would check the information of your application after awarding status, which means that misinformation could be discovered at any time. In fact, providing the wrong information on any government application form could lead to the Canadian government expelling you from the country as a permanent resident.

Myth: If You Lose Your PR Card, You’re No Longer a Permanent Resident

Some people worry that their status will be revoked if they accidentally lose their permanent residency card. If this happen to you, all you need to do is contact your local government immigration office to arrange a replacement.

Your PR card is identification that reflects your status, similar to how a passport or a birth certificate isn’t Canadian citizenship, but a reflection of status as a citizen. It’s important to replace your PR card as soon as possible, but you won’t be kicked out of the country if you lose this document.

It’s especially important to replace your card to avoid headaches at the border. If you don’t have it with you when you return to Canada, you’ll be required to get a Permanent Resident Travel Document to return via commercial jet.

Myth: You Need to Be Married For Permanent Residency

One of the most common permanent residency myths involves the belief that you need to be married in order for an application to be successful. However, Canada doesn’t consider marriage as a obligation to apply for status.

Typically, the minimum requirement is for a couple to be living as married for a year, which is considered to be a common-law arrangement. The Canadian government is aware that there are scenarios which may have made it impossible for couples to spend the required time together. In these cases, you may apply for status as conjugal partners while explaining the circumstances behind the problem, such as religious or ethnic persecution.

Guidance Through the Maze of Bureaucracy

Are you interested in immigrating to the U.S. or Canada? Contact VisaPlace today.

All our cases are handled by competent and experienced immigration professionals who are affiliated with VisaPlace. These professionals consist of lawyers, licensed paralegals and consultants who work for Niren and Associates an award winning immigration firm that adheres to the highest standards of client service.

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Michael Niren

About Michael Niren

Michael is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He is a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Canadian Bar Association’s Citizenship and Immigration Section and the Associate Member of the American Bar Association. Read more

12 thoughts on “5 Myths About Canadian Permanent Residency

  1. GS Reddy

    I received my PR card on April 2014, after my landing procedure I lived outside Canada for the past 2+years. Can I still travel to Canada with my PR card? How do I validate the validity of PR status?

  2. KIRAN

    iam kiran . i have lost my renewed pr card (sept 2015) during my holidays in june 1 wk . now i have to return to canada for the job which starts in july. currently i am in middle east for 2 wks and have applied for prtd from abudhabi . its almost 3 wks still no reply from canada visa office . how do i travel back to canada. I have u.s,a visa m and i am from non visa exempt country.
    Any suggestion.

    1. Muga Rajbhandari

      Hello Kiran. I understand your frustration. You will need a apply for a Canadian travel document from the country where you currently are in order to come back to Canada.
      Regards, Muga

  3. sudor

    i am interested in canadian immigration and will soon create an express entry profile please can you aid me get a job offer supported by an lmia as soon as possible? And how many points does the job offer have in the pool?

    1. Vahe Mirzoyan

      Hello Sudor. Unfortunately you will have to find a job offer on your own; we cannot help you with that. There are many Canadian online job boards that you will be able to find many opportunities.
      Best regards, Vahe

  4. Noor Hassan

    Sir My Name is Noor Hassan and intrested for Canadain Immigration please guide me in this process.
     Enrolled in M.Phil. (Arts & Design) 2014-15
    University of Sindh Jamshoro
     Bachelor of Design “Hons” (Textile) (1st Division)
    Centre of Excellence in art & Design (MUTE) Jamshoro, 2009
     H.S.C (2nd Division)
    Shah Abdul Latif Government College Mirpurkhas 2003
     S.S.C (2nd Division)
    Government High School Samaro 2001
     Textile Design
     Constructed Textile /Weaving
     Computer Aided Design
     Drawing for Design
     CONUCT OF PRACTICAL (VIVA-VOCE) EXAMINATION AS AN EXTERNAL EXAMINER in the department of Textile Design on 5/6/2015 at CEAD, MUET, jamshoro.
     CONUCT OF PRACTICAL (VIVA-VOCE) EXAMINATION AS AN EXTERNAL EXAMINER in the department of Textile Design on 15-12-2015 at CEAD, MUET, jamshoro.

    TEACHING ASSOCIATE in College of Design, Hala. (PIFD) Lahore. 26-03-2013 till now.
     Preparation Lesson Planning
     Course content
     Preparation for Class Research, Slide Show and Handouts
     Develop Scheme of Studies and course outline for Two Year Associate Degree Program in Textile Design of College of Design Hala. (PIFD Lahore).


     Working as a Hostel Warden in College of Design, Hala.
     Working as a Monthly Meeting In Charge in College of Design, Hala

    LECTURER in Center of Excellence in arts & design (MUET) Jamshoro. 01-03-2009 to 20-03-2013.
     Preparation for Class Research, slide show and handout
     Working as a Thesis advisor

    • Professional Contemporary Enhancement Program for Teachers (PCEPT) 2013
    Pakistan Institute of fashion and Design, Lahore.

    • Natural Dyes Solo Exhibition at Expo Centre Karachi in 2011

    • Thesis Exhibition (2009)
    Centre of Excellence in arts & design, Mehran University of Engineering & Technology, Jamshoro.

    • Calligraphy Workshop & Exhibition (2007)
    Karachi Arts Council, Karachi

    • National College of arts Lahore Textile CAD for Screen Printing (Fashion Studio Screen Printing, Photoshop 12th June – 12th july,2005.

    • Workshop on Aspects of Design.(September 20th to 10th October 2004)
     Batik
     Weaving
     Felt making
     Natural dyeing
     Tie and dye techniques
     Paper making
     Digital Printing
     Photography
     Free hand Drawing
     Applica Work
     Replica Work
     Screen Print Techniques
     Block Printing Techniques

     Adobe Photoshop
     Free hand
     Vision Coloring
     Vision Color Separation
     Vision Design and Repeat
     Vision Story Board

    1. Vahe Mirzoyan

      Hello Noor. The best path for you seems to be from what you have written, the Express Entry program. I am going to suggest that you contact us to make an appointment to talk with one of our immigration professionals who will be able to plan the best strategy for you. You can book an appointment by calling us at 1-855-886-8472 or online at
      Regards, Vahe

  5. Rekha

    Hi sir
    I am Canadian citizen. And I moved TN visa 3 yrs and my family life distub some family issues .if after 1 yrs divorce what is the process and time to spouse visa my second marriage in my own country. Please reply me I am need your advise

    1. Vahe Mirzoyan

      Hello Rekha. I am sorry to hear about your troubles. It must be very stressful. Your situation because it is a second marriage, is not simple. I am going to suggest that you contact us to make an appointment to talk with one of our immigration professionals who will be able to plan the best strategy for you. You can book an appointment by calling us at 1-855-886-8472 or online at
      Regards, Vahe

  6. Shashi Shrestha

    Hi Niren and Associates.

    I have a question about Permanent Residency of Canada. I hope, you will guide me properly.

    I completed diploma of hospitality management from Australia in 2008. It’s a 2 years diploma course. I have around 3 years of work experience as a Chef. Now, I am in my home country , Nepal and want to apply for Canada permanent residency. I visited many online sites but couldn’t get any good feedback. I have my IELTS score in my hand. I got L5.5, R6, W6,S6.5. Overall it’s 6.

    Can I apply permanent residency without any job offer because it is very hard to find a job offer from Canada. Please revert my message. My number is: +977 9845920020.

    Thank you.

    Shashi Shrestha

    1. Vahe Mirzoyan

      Thank you for writing to us Shashi. From looking at what you have written, I can see that you have very good qualifications for some of the immigration programs that are currently open in different parts of Canada. All the programs are points-based, and the qualifying number of points is at an all time low. That number is sure to rise as more people take advantage of the timing. I am going to suggest that you contact us as soon as possible to make an appointment to talk with one of our immigration professionals who will be able to plan a strategy to find you and your spouse the immigration program that gives you the fastest and most dependable chances of success. To make the appointment you can call us at 1-855-886-8472 or book the appointment online at
      Regards, Vahe

  7. P Malloy

    The process regarding permanent residency is set on an objective set of criteria and yet, when it comes to the interview the subjective view of the person overshadows the objective.
    Living as a married couple does not seem to matter. Proof of the relationship does not have any bearing. It is the person who conducts the interview who holds all the power.
    Finally, limiting the interview to the applicant and not the sponsor does not support the comments made by the applicant.
    Permanent residency needs to remain objective, the interview needs to be taped and conducted using good communication skills, and finally both parties need to be part of the interview.


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