People having trouble getting H1B Visas can try a Start-Up Visa

“H1B Problems? Pivot to Canada. New Start-Up Visa. Low Taxes,” says a billboard in the middle of Silicon Valley in San Jose, California. The billboard was recently erected by Citizenship and Immigration Canada in an effort to lure skilled and innovative immigrants to Canada instead of the United States. Start-Up Visa
And, it might just work. The United States offers the H1B work visa, but only a certain number of them every year. Companies are constantly trying to get the government to increase the number available, as well as make the visa more attractive by making it a more direct pathway to permanent residency. While permanent residency in the Untied States (a green card) may be eventually attainable, many H1B visa holders are stuck renewing their visa time after time.

The Start-Up visa in Canada is a much more attractive option, and the Canadian government wants you to know it.

Start-Up Visa offers permanent residence to qualified entrepreneurs

The Start-Up Visa will offer permanent residence to people who meet the guidelines, whether or not their business fails or succeeds. In addition, the government promises fast processing times for these visas, allowing applicants to start their businesses sooner.

In order to obtain a Start-Up visa, applicants will have to pitch their ideas to approved investors. These investors can then invest in the ideas if they like them, resulting in approval for a Start-Up Visa.

Are you interested in coming to Canada? The Start-Up visa, while a new program, is already anticipated to be hugely popular and successful. We can help you apply. Call our award-winning immigration law firm at the phone number above for assistance with your application and get started today!

Michael Niren

About Michael Niren

Michael is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He is a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Canadian Bar Association’s Citizenship and Immigration Section and the Associate Member of the American Bar Association. Read more

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