Steps to renewing your permanent resident card in Canada

Permanent residents are people who have immigrated to Canada and who can live and work in Canada permanently. However, permanent residents are not yet Canadian citizens and they must maintain certain requirements with their permanent resident cards, which are certain identification cards they must hold. How to renew your permanent resident card 3

Permanent resident cards expire every five years, when they need to be renewed. However, permanent residents need to apply to renew their cards long before they expire. The government recommends applying to renew your card at least six months before it expires.

How to renew your permanent resident card in Canada

In order to renew your permanent resident card, you need to meet two main requirements. One is that you have met your permanent residency obligation by living in Canada for the required amount of time per year while the second is that you are in Canada when you apply to renew your card. If you are not currently in Canada or you have not met the residency requirement, you need to speak with a licensed immigration lawyer as soon as possible.

Step 1: Make an application by obtaining the application forms and filling them out completely without leaving any empty spaces.

Step 2: Review the document checklist that comes with your application forms, ensuring that you can and have included all of the required documentation, including passport photos.

Step 3: Speak with a licensed immigration lawyer about your application to make sure that everything is put together properly. If not, you could experience a significant delay or even a denial.

Step 4: Pay the application fee for your permanent resident card renewal, and submit your application.

We have helped countless permanent residents obtain their renewed permanent resident cards, and we can help you too! Just give us a call at the number above for assistance.

Michael Niren

About Michael Niren

Michael is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He is a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Canadian Bar Association’s Citizenship and Immigration Section and the Associate Member of the American Bar Association. Read more

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