Canadian Immigration: Expired PR Card

canadian-immigration-expired-pr-cardIf you are a Canadian permanent resident, you should be holding a valid permanent resident card. As of 2002, permanent residents who land in Canada receive their permanent resident card (also called a PR card) automatically. If you landed in Canada prior to this time, you have to apply for one on your own. To apply, please contact us. We can help you prepare your application for your initial permanent resident card.

Has your Canadian Permanent Resident card Expired?

The first thing you need to do if your permanent resident card has expired is ensure that you make an application for a new card. Your PR card will expire every five years, and you must renew it every time.

In the best case scenario, you should apply to renew your PR card as soon as possible when you notice it is going to expire soon. The most ideal time to renew your PR card is between two to three months before the expiry date on your card.

To do this, you will need to obtain and fill out an Application for a Permanent Resident Card (form IMM5444) and include all of the supporting documentation necessary for this application, including:

Photocopies of a primary identity document, two secondary identity documents, proof of your physical presence in Canada, two photos that meet the requirements for a permanent residency card and possibly other documents depending on your individual circumstances – such as if you are a minor or did not meet the residency requirement.

You must also include the Supplementary Identification Form and the fee receipt to show that you’ve paid the fee for the application.

What is the Residency Requirement for a Canadian Permanent Resident Card?

The residency requirement is a very important part of being a permanent resident. Permanent residents must live in Canada, meaning they need to be physically present in Canada for a specific time during each five years the PR card is valid. This time frame for the residency obligation is two years of every five you are a permanent resident. You must be able to prove to the government that you have met this requirement in order to renew your card.

Have you been unable to meet the residency requirement? Book an appointment so we can help you even if you have not met the residency requirement to renew your PR card.

Michael Niren

About Michael Niren

Michael is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He is a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Canadian Bar Association’s Citizenship and Immigration Section and the Associate Member of the American Bar Association. Read more

2 thoughts on “Canadian Immigration: Expired PR Card

  1. Mira Freiwat

    Hello Sara,

    Thank you for your inquiry. There are hundreds of applicants that became PR holders and did not meet the residency obligation, much like yourself, and were able to reapply and successfully obtain a new one. But in order for me to be able to determine your eligibility, I would need more information to be able to advise you accurately on what you can do to have PR status in Canada again. Please email us at [email protected] and we will set up a consultation with you to be able to advise you accordingly. MF

  2. Sara Motamedi

    Dear sir/mam
    I am Iranian and got my pr card on 2005. I travelled two times to Canada and stayed totally about one year in Canada. Then I got married and applied for my husband but he didn’t approve in interview I had to appeal but never did that. I never went back to Canada.
    After a while unfortunately I lost my pr card and informed the Canadian embassy in Iran.
    I know my pr card is expired on 2010.
    I really like to go to Canada and live there.
    Can you help me in this case? Do you think it might be possible to get my pr card again?
    If it is possible could you please tell me about the fees
    Best regards
    Sara Motamedi


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