Immigration Lawyer Michael Niren Quoted: Bill C-43

The recently proposed Bill C-43, the Faster Removal of Foreign Criminals Act, will ensure that Canada has some of the strictest deportation laws among the Westernized world. 

For example, as of right now permanent residents in Canada who are convicted of a crime and serving sentences less than two years are given the right to appeal a deportation order. But the appeals process is backlogged, so the new bill would make it so that permanent residents that are given sentences of six months or more won’t be able to appeal.

Our own immigration lawyer Michael Niren was interviewed by, saying “I think we’d be more in line with other countries, even the United States…” – The United States has some of the strictest deportation laws in the world – “Canada is catching up in that regard. Is that necessarily a good thing? No.”

In fact, a US immigration attorney interviewed for the same article said the new Canadian law seems tougher than the United States’ deportation law, where foreign criminals can fight their deportation for up to a year.

“We have to remember that we do live in a democratic country and the way in which we treat, whether they’re domestic criminals or foreign criminals, will be looked at by other nations,” Niren said. “Canada, I think, is going to opposite direction. We’re very enforcement-minded, very protectionist.”


Michael Niren

About Michael Niren

Michael is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He is a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Canadian Bar Association’s Citizenship and Immigration Section and the Associate Member of the American Bar Association. Read more

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