Fewer Immigrants Settling In Ontario: Ontario Wants More Power To Pick Skilled Immigrants

The Ontario government is currently dealing with labour market needs that the current declining immigration levels are unable to fill, and wants more power to choose skilled workers in the Province. 

On Monday, November 5th, Ontario Immigration Minister Charles Sousa unveiled Ontario’s new immigration strategy, saying that Ontario should increase immigrants under the Ontario Provincial Nominee Program by 4,000, giving the province a total 5,000 people admitted to Ontario under the Provincial Nominee Program instead of the 1,000 quota the federal government has allowed Ontario.

Immigration levels in Ontario are dropping

In Ontario, economic immigrants like skilled workers or investors account for just over half (52 per cent) of the total immigrants arriving in the province every year. However, in other provinces this number is as high as 70 per cent. The number of total immigrants in Ontario, whether they are refugees, reunified family members or economic immigrants, has dropped from 148,640 in 2001 to 99,000 last year – a decline of one-third. Ontario is partially blaming this decline on the Federal Skilled Worker Program restrictions, because that’s where the majority of immigrants to Ontario come from.

According to this article in the Toronto Star, by 2025 Ontario will have a shortage of skilled workers – by 364,000.

Michael Niren

About Michael Niren

Michael is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He is a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Canadian Bar Association’s Citizenship and Immigration Section and the Associate Member of the American Bar Association. Read more

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