Four changes to how parents and grandparents are sponsored in Canada

You may have heard that the Canadian government had suspended the family sponsorship program that allowed permanent residents and citizens of Canada to sponsor their parents and grandparents for permanent residency. This was done because there was a huge backlog of applications for permanent residency and these applications were taking too long to process.

In the meantime, the government introduced the Super Visa: a way for parents and grandparents to come to Canada, but for long-term visits instead of permanently. This visa allows individuals to come to Canada multiple times for 10 years, for up to two years at a time. Parents and Grandparents

Now the backlog of applications has been reduced and the government is going to reopen the parent and grandparent sponsorship applications on January 2, 2014. But there will be some changes:

What’s changing in the Parent and Grandparent Program?

There will be four different changes to the Parent and Grandparent Program.

First: In 2012 and 2013, 50,000 parents and grandparents will become permanent residents of Canada, and similarly high levels will be maintained for 2014.

Second: The Super Visa, the long-term multiple-entry visa that was a temporary compromise while the program was suspended, will now be a permanent offering. It currently has approval rates of about 86 per cent on average.

Third: Permanent residents and Canadian citizens who apply to sponsor their parents or grandparents will have to meet stricter financial requirements than before.

Fourth: In 2014, 5,000 sponsorship applications will be accepted in order to maintain high levels while also allow the government to reduce the backlog further.

Are you a permanent resident or Canadian citizen who wishes to apply to sponsor their parents or grandparents to come to Canada? We can help you. Please call us at the number above for assistance.

Michael Niren

About Michael Niren

Michael is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He is a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Canadian Bar Association’s Citizenship and Immigration Section and the Associate Member of the American Bar Association. Read more

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