Temporary resident permits and criminal inadmissibility

Criminal inadmissibility to Canada is a serious issue that many United States citizens and other foreign nationals face every day. They cannot enter Canada because they have a criminal record, and if they attempt to enter they will likely be denied entry or worse, detained in rare cases. Denied Entry to Canada

Border security is much more strict these days, and overall restrictions and requirements for everyday people traveling to Canada are much more significant than they were years ago. In fact, it doesn’t matter how small or old your criminal record is, there is still a chance you will be refused entry should you try and enter Canada.

What can you do? You do have options.

Speak to a licensed immigration lawyer about a Temporary Resident Permit

If you are concerned about being denied entry to Canada, speak with a licensed immigration lawyer as soon as possible to learn about your options. You may have several different options regarding overcoming your criminal inadmissibility, including applying for a Temporary Resident Permit or criminal rehabilitation.

Criminal rehabilitation may be a better option for you if you are someone who has an older criminal record and could meet the requirements to be eligible to remove your criminal inadmissibility permanently. While this is a long process, it can be extremely worthwhile provided you are eligible.

You may also be able to apply for a Temporary Resident Permit, which is a quick process. This process, however, is only temporary and while you can apply at the US-Canada border, you can also be denied despite having traveled all of the way to the border.

Ensure that you have only set yourself up for the best chances of success when overcoming or removing your criminal inadmissibility to Canada by ensuring that you speak with a licensed immigration lawyer first.

Michael Niren

About Michael Niren

Michael is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He is a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Canadian Bar Association’s Citizenship and Immigration Section and the Associate Member of the American Bar Association. Read more

4 thoughts on “Temporary resident permits and criminal inadmissibility

  1. PG

    Message: Currently applying for a Provincial Nomination at SK through SK. Will be submitting an updated “Schedule A” form later

    – Visa Refused in UK on March 2012. Immigration found that my tax records are fake. 10 year ban
    – Declared this refusal last year for SK Provincial Nomination (Schedule A) and Australian tourist visa. They did not ask the circumstances and I passed both…

    1. Vahe Mirzoyan

      We advise all of our clients to always be upfront and honest with all the questions that you are asked by the immigration officers.
      Regards, Vahe

  2. Gurtaranvir

    hi there,
    i am criminally, inadmissable to enter canada till 17 of may 2017, due to an drink driving offence that occurred in melbourne on 17 december 2011. i live in australia. i would like to move permanently to canada, so if you can help me out in removing my inadmissibility,, or any advice would be highly appreciated. looking forward to hearing from you soon.

    1. Michael Niren Post author

      Hello Gurtaranvir

      Thank you for your post. Based on the information you provided, we would have to apply for an Authorization to Return (ARC) to Canada as well as a PR application. We would first have to have a consultation with you to get all the information in order to help you. But generally you need to apply for an ARC given your inadmissibility situation. Best Michael Niren


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