Can My Spouse Get a Work Permit if I Have One?

(Below is a transcription of this video)

Hello my name is Michael Niren, Immigration Lawyer and founder of We are asked the following question: If I have a work visa can my spouse work?

Work Permit Options for Spouse

Well, the answer really depends on the kind of visa that was issued. So for example, if you were issued an H-1B visa, that’s a specialty occupation visa to the United States, the answer generally is, no. There is really no provision for your spouse to get a visa, although they are thinking of changing that to make things easier. However, if you are issued an E2 visa, for example, which is an investor visa, your spouse would be able to apply for a visa, on the basis that you have an E2, you’re the principal applicant. So it really depends on the kind of visa, the work visa that was issued to you.

On the Canadian side, the same applies. Generally if you get a work visa, the spouse of the principal applicant can apply in most cases for a work permit because the principal applicant has the visa.

Work Eligibility Is Determined by the Type of Work Permit

So it really, really depends on the kind of work permit you have and the country you’re getting the visa from. Now, in some cases if there is no provision for a spouse to get a work visa, that spouse could always apply on his or her own but of course you have to qualify in your own right. So we’ve had cases where both spouses have had work visas and have applied on their own. So there are options it all depends again, on the visa in question. Thank you and have a great day and don’t hesitate to visit us on

Are You a Spouse Interested in Getting a Work Permit?

If you have immigration questions, VisaPlace is here to guide you through the immigration process. We work with qualified immigration lawyers who can help you with your work permit application. Contact us to book a consultation.

Michael Niren

About Michael Niren

Michael is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He is a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Canadian Bar Association’s Citizenship and Immigration Section and the Associate Member of the American Bar Association. Read more

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