A Need for Immigrants in Halifax


The need for immigrants in Halifax, Nova Scotia is extremely high. New restrictions and visa fees have caused a major downturn in the influx of working foreigners to Halifax and Canada in general.

Specifically, changes in the Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP) hurt Canadian employers and temporary foreign workers alike.

About Labour Market Impact Assessments (LMIAs)

Labour Market Impact Assessments, formerly known as Labour Market Opinions (LMOs), are requisite governmental approval of any foreign worker prior to their gaining any kind of official work status.

These are issued by Service Canada in cases where a Canadian employer is unable to use a Canadian worker to fill the position. Fees have also jumped now, from $275 to $1000 per worker. This is a major reason why the need for immigrants in Halifax is so great.

High-Wage vs. Low-Wage LMIAs

More restrictions have been imposed upon low-wage jobs than high-wage ones. Also, high-wage employers have now been forced to outlay long-term plans to fill the position, which is only being temporarily filled by the foreign laborer.

These same employers must also keep more extensive records relating to the foreign worker’s time in Canada. On the low-wage employment side, employers can only hire foreign workers for up to one year at a time, in return for a positive LMIA. Also, foreign workers may not make up more than 10% of the workforce in companies with 10 or more workers. There are also higher application fees for both high and low-wage employers alike. Again, these are all reasons, which have precipitated the soaring need for immigrants in Halifax at this time.

Exceptions to the LMIA Rule

There are exceptions to the rule, which include but are not limited to those for:

  • Holders of post-graduate work permits
  • Academic exchange program participants
  • Participants in International Experience Canada
  • NAFTA-covered workers
  • Intra-company transferees

Weighing in on Canadian Foreign Workers

An interesting article ran in The Star’s commentary section. It was titled Kill Canada’s Temporary Foreign Worker Program, by Haroon Siddiqui. The piece excoriates certain Canadian government officials for creating a mess of a once relatively benign foreign worker program, then posing as its reformers.

Like Australia, Canada seems to be shutting the door on foreigners. Both are making it cost-prohibitive to fill domestic positions with those from abroad.

Siddiqui reminds us, “it was foreigners who built this country,” calling for less bureaucratic meddling with employers.

According to Nova Scotia Immigration, 92% of Nova Scotia companies have fewer than 20 employees. So small businesses bear the cost of temporary foreign worker “reform” alongside more financially-able companies. This creates the need for immigrants in Halifax to take on more complex, new proportions.

Is this the way toward economic strength or breakdown?

Are You Interested in Immigrating to Halifax?

The VisaPlace Group of Lawyers (VPGs) and their staff are all independent, licensed practitioners who understand how important it is for to you to achieve your immigration goals and have been trained to follow best practices and procedures to maximize your chances of success. If you are interested in immigrating to Halifax, we may be able help. Contact us to book a consultation.

Michael Niren

About Michael Niren

Michael is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He is a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Canadian Bar Association’s Citizenship and Immigration Section and the Associate Member of the American Bar Association. Read more

Leave a Comment:

Your email address will not be published.


The content and comments of this blog are not legal advise and and may not be accurate or complete. If you require legal advice, contact a licensed legal practitioner directly. If you post on this blog, you assume full responsibility for disclosing your identity to the public and VisaPlace nor its affiliates are not responsible for protecting your privacy nor your identity concerning your participation in our blog and you assume any risks in participating.