Canadian Immigration: 10 Questions to Ask Before Going North

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Being given the opportunity to move to Canada with your spouse or significant other can seem like a great chance to start a new life together, but there are certain things you need to ask yourself before you make that all-important decision.

We’ve put together a list of important questions relating to Canadian immigration that you should ask yourself before heading north!

1. Am I Really Ready?

Chances are, you have established a life where you are, complete with people who are important to you, including close friends and family. How will you feel about leaving all that behind?

2. Why Did I Choose Canada?

Perhaps the statistics speak for themselves (via MarketWatch): “Canada has the world’s best reputation internationally as a place to do business and live for the third consecutive year, according to the latest annual survey of more than 27,000 people around the world by the Reputation Institute, an international corporate advisory firm.”

3. Which Region Will I Live In?

Canada is such a large country, with many differing climates and economic outlooks. Remember, this decision will affect the rest of your life, so take the time to pick a location you’re going to be happy with.

4. How Long Will I Be There?

Do you have a plan in case things don’t work out, or are you determined to settle in Canada for the long-term? Are you prepared to spend the rest of your life there?

5. How Will I Support Myself?

Making the move to Canada will require some initial savings in order for it to be financially viable. Do you have enough money in the bank to adequately support yourself while you get on your feet? Will you or your partner be able to find a job when you get there?

6. Do I Meet the Necessary Visa and Work Permit Requirements?

If you’re going to live and work in Canada, you’re going to need to meet certain visa requirements. MoveHub says: “Moving to Canada is an exciting decision to make, and the good news is that the visa application process is relatively easy to work through.” You or your spouse may be able to apply for Express Entry to gain Canadian permanent residence.

7. Will I Buy or Rent a Home?

If you’re not sure how things will work out, you may decide to rent a home in Canada rather than immediately buying a property. However, owning a home could make more financial sense if you’re fairly confident you’ll be happy with your new lives.

8. Will My Kids Grow up Here?

If you and your partner have considered having kids, you should think carefully about how your Canadian immigration could affect their future. Canada is well known for being among the top countries in the world for quality of living.

9. Will My Partner Be Happy Here?

If you’ve been offered a job, but your partner hasn’t, how can you be sure that they will be able to settle and find work? Talk to your partner openly and frankly about Canadian immigration and the decision you are making together, and be 100 percent sure that this is the right decision for both of you.

10. Have I Been Offered Job Security?

Finally, how can you be sure that your job in Canada is going to be for the long-term? If you or your partner have received a job offer, check that your employment opportunity is permanent and secure – otherwise you could be heading back to your home country a lot sooner than you expected.

If you’ve asked yourself all these questions and are feeling confident about your decision to immigrate to Canada, your next step is to contact an immigration lawyer to help you with the process and paperwork. At VisaPlace, we offer a free immigration assessment to get you started. Contact us today!

Michael Niren

About Michael Niren

Michael is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He is a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Canadian Bar Association’s Citizenship and Immigration Section and the Associate Member of the American Bar Association. Read more

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