Robin Thicke’s Son was Refused Canadian Citizenship it seems

Despite his celebrity status, Robin Thicke, the 35-year-old son of Canadian superstar Alan Thicke has his application for Canadian citizenship for his two-year-old son, Julian denied.  

Quick look on Thicke’s Citizenship

Robin, who was born in the United States, was not given Canadian citizenship because Alan never applied to make him a dual citizen. This means that his grandson Julian does not qualify for citizenship.

  • In the past, Canada would grant citizenship to grandchildren of native Canadians but that is no longer the case.
  • In order to be granted Canadian citizens, Citizenship and Immigration Canada require that one of the parents need to be a Canadian citizen themselves.
  • In the case of Julian, both Robin and his mother, actress Paula Patton never acquired Canadian citizenship themselves.

Disappointment over citizenship mistake

Alan, the 65-year-old star of the hit television show Growing Pains commented that he regrets not making Robin or his two other children Canadian citizens as none of them were born on Canadian soil.

According to Alan, he is fiercely Canadian and not obtaining citizenship for his children was not something that he gave a lot of thought to.

Actions and legal impact

What a person does could legally impair one’s title to a right or privilege. It is always best to speak to a licensed immigration attorney before taking any action on certain legal matters. Obtaining Canadian citizenship is covered by a set of law, which may appear to be complex to some individuals.


Who can apply for a Canadian citizen

  • Applicant must be at least 18 years of age at the time of applying.
  • Applicant must possess a valid permanent resident status and must have lived in Canada for at least three (3) years or 1,095 days in the past four years prior to applying. This rule does not apply to children below 18.
  • Applicants can communicate in English or French and must pass the citizenship knowledge test.
  • Applicants must pass the criminal record check.
  • You must not have been convicted of a serious criminal offence or an offence under the Citizenship Act within the three years prior to applying;
  • You are currently not charged with an indictable offence or an offence under the Citizenship Act;
  • You should not be in prison, on parole or on probation when you are applying;
  • You should not be under a removal proceeding or ordered by a Canadian officer to leave the country;
  • You should not be under investigation for, be charged with, or have been convicted of a war crime or a crime against humanity; or
  • Your Canadian citizenship was not taken away from you in the past five years.
  • Applicants should understand information about Canada and this includes rights and responsibilities of a citizen.

Need help?

For your citizenship needs or questions, you may consult one of the dedicated teams of immigration lawyers at Niren and Associates.

Niren and Associates is one of the most trusted immigration firms in canada and the United States for well over 15 years.

For free assessment of your immigration case, you may contact 1-888-710-8987 or send a message to [email protected].

Michael Niren

About Michael Niren

Michael is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He is a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Canadian Bar Association’s Citizenship and Immigration Section and the Associate Member of the American Bar Association. Read more

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