Are You Qualified to Work as a Nanny in Canada?

How to Become a Nanny in Canada

Want to see the world? Find a new home? Expand your resume and your horizons? Working as a nanny in Canada may be an ideal option. Here’s what you need to know in order to determine if this direction is right for you.

Two Ways to Become a Nanny

The requirements for a foreign nanny working in Canada depend on the program you apply under. While some applicants may still be processed through the Live-In Caregiver Program, the late-2014 reforms reported by Canada Immigration News have made applying as a temporary foreign worker a viable alternative.

For Live-in Caregivers

If you are already part of the Live-in Caregiver Program, you can continue to work as a nanny under this program. You’ll need a new work permit, but the other requirements as outlined by Citizenship and Immigration Canada remain the same:

  • an education equivalent to a Canadian secondary school diploma
  • a minimum of either of the following: six months of full-time classroom training in caregiving, or a year of work experience as a caregiver or in a related job within the last three years (including at least six months of ongoing work with one employer)
  • the ability to speak, read, and understand one of Canada’s official languages (English or French)
  • medical, security, and criminal clearances
  • a signed written employment contract from a Canadian employer

You can also apply through the Live-in Caregiver Program if your potential employer applied for an LMIA (Labour Market Impact Assessment) before November 30, 2014. More on LMIAs later.

For Temporary Foreign Workers

As Citizenship and Immigration Canada explains, you’ll have to meet the following requirements if you apply as a temporary foreign worker:

  • provide care for a minimum of 30 hours per week
  • work in the private household of the cared-for individual(s)
  • meet the requirements laid out by Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) and Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC)

Live-in caregivers have to meet the general requirements for obtaining a work permit, such as speaking and understanding one of Canada’s official languages, having sufficient money to support any family members they bring to Canada, have no criminal record, not present a danger to Canada’s security, and have proof they will leave Canada when their work permit expires.

Additionally, according to the National Occupation Classification for babysitters, nannies, and parents’ helpers, you may need to have some or all of the following qualifications:

  • completed secondary school
  • completed a training program in childcare or a related field
  • have experience in childcare or household management
  • have a demonstrable ability to perform the work required
  • possess first aid certification and CPR training

Labour Market Impact Assessments: Who Needs Them?

The short answer is your employer, regardless of which program you apply under. In order to come to work in Canada as a nanny, your employer will need an LMIA in order to prove that a foreign worker is needed to fill the position because no qualified Canadian worker is available.

What does this mean to you? A few things. One, it means that you need to check that your employer has the necessary paperwork filled out. They have to prove that your work is needed. An LMIA is not the only document your employer will have to supply you with for your application, so you’ll want to keep informed about what they are doing to facilitate your coming to work for them. Two, the need for an LMIA highlights the competitive nature of Canada’s job market and the government’s prioritizing of Canadian workers, so the more education, skills, and experience you have in childcare, the better you’ll look as a potential nanny.

If you’re overwhelmed and looking for help with your application, an immigration professional can help you navigate the Canadian immigration system, ensuring that you follow all the necessary steps and send a persuasive application with the right documentation. Let someone who knows the system help you secure your job and your future.

It’s Our Job to Help You Work Here

Are you interested in immigrating to the U.S. or Canada? Contact VisaPlace today.

All our cases are handled by competent and experienced immigration professionals who are affiliated with VisaPlace. These professionals consist of lawyers, licensed paralegals, and consultants who work for Niren and Associates: an award-winning immigration firm that adheres to the highest standards of client service.

Click here to book a consultation with an immigration professional or fill out our FREE assessment and we will get back to you within 24 hours.

Michael Niren

About Michael Niren

Michael is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He is a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Canadian Bar Association’s Citizenship and Immigration Section and the Associate Member of the American Bar Association. Read more

2 thoughts on “Are You Qualified to Work as a Nanny in Canada?

  1. Bernadette Nneji

    Well done . I am a Nigerian and have the qualifications to work as a live in care giver or nanny. I wish to obtain a work permit. How do you help me?

    1. Muga Rajbhandari

      Hello Bernadette. Your first step is to find a Canadian employer who will hire you as a live in caregiver. The employer will have submit a Labor Market Impact Assessment (LMIA). We will be able to assist in the process as soon as you have a job offer. Once you have a job offer, I am going to suggest that you contact us to make an appointment to talk with one of our immigration professionals who will be able to plan the best strategy for you. You can book an appointment by calling us at 1-855-886-8472 or online at
      Regards, Muga


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